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Prune Nourry: Terracotta Daughters

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Prune Nourry: Terracotta Daughters

13.06-11.07.14

PRUNE NOURRY / TERRACOTTA DAUGHTERS -


Sculptures, installation, videos

Opening and gustatory performance
Friday June 13, 2014, at 6pm

Open without interruption on Saturday 14 and Sunday 15 June, from 12 pm until 6 pm

Exhibition from June 14 until July 11, 2014
Mon-Fri, 9am - 6pm, or by appointment
Sat, 12pm - 6pm


Following her Holy Daughters project in India, Prune Nourry, based in New York, now reflects upon gender preference in China with her latest project, Terracotta Daughters. The artist created a life-size army of 108 little girls inspired by the ancient Xi’an Terracotta Warriors. Zurich is the last European stop before the army travels to the United States and Latin America. The army will then return to China in late 2014 to be buried in the same way as the original warriors - creating a contemporary archeological site. Prune plans to excavate her girls in 2030 when sociologists anticipate the demographic inbalance will be at its worst.
Exhibition curated by Tatyana Franck.

 

China and India represent 1/3 of the world's population and present the same lack of balance between genders. This sociological phenomenon is explained by the fact that most Chinese parents want to have a son rather than a daughter. The number of single men has increased since the 1980s and since the introduction of echography. This phenomenon has disastrous repercussions on women's situation in Asia (kidnappings of children and women, forced marriages, prostitution, migrations of populations...).